Grilling, Health, Health Food, Healthy, Healthy Fats, Holistic, Meat, Nutrition, Nutritional Therapy, Organic, Summer, Vegetables, Wellness

To Grill or Grill Not…

Beef steak with grilled vegetables

By Cynthia Hill, NTP

As the first hint of summer makes its slow arrival in the Midwest,  I step outside late afternoon to enjoy the warming temps.  Immediately I begin to smell the most wonderful intoxicating scent.  It takes my brain a moment to identify what it is – oh yes! someone in the neighborhood has fired up their grill  – the  unmistakable smoky aroma of backyard grilling, summer and happiness! I realize momentarily how I have missed the smell & taste of grilled foods throughout the long winter months. Now this tantalizing scent beckons me, beckons me to release our own grill from its winter cover and  start planning a meal around it.   But wait… isn’t grilling food bad for you???

Grilling in general and especially grilled meat has had its share of bad press lately.  With the onset of warmer weather the warnings about the dangers of grilling and barbecuing return, and how doing so contributes to the formation of carcinogens (PAHs) and mutagens (HCA) in our food.

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Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are present in the smoke created from fat dripping onto hot coals.  Heterocyclic amines (HCAs) are produced when amino acids, sugars and creatine in meat react with heat.  Does grilling generate enough of these carcinogenic compounds to pose a threat to our health and steer clear of the grill forever?  Mark Sisson, primal living expert, and author of the Primal Blueprint writes he may have “overstated the danger of the carcinogenic compounds found in charred meat”.  In his article “How Bad is Charred Meat, Really?”  he references numerous studies that show the doses of HCA in animal testing to be 1000s of times higher than what we would get from grilling. (The National Cancer Institute also suggests that both HCA and PAH dosing in animal models is thousands of times higher than what we would consume in our diet).

Author Kaayla T. Daniel, PhD, “The Naughty Nutritionist” states “it’s a myth that HCAs are mostly found in fried or grilled beef, poultry and fish.”  Her post “Barbecue Meat a Safer Choice than Packaged Protein Foods” explains why we are more likely to get more carcinogenic HCAs from processed and fast foods than from the grill.

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This leaves me with a burning question from an ancestral point of view – man has been grilling for a very very long time.  If it is so bad for us, why do the carcinogenic effects only appear to have happened in the last 150 years?  We must consider our current diet of high PUFAs, processed foods, grain fed animals and environmental toxicity as contributing factors.

Would I eat grilled foods every day? probably not as with most things moderation is key. I will continue though, to eat a cancer fighting nutrient dense whole foods diet (including plenty of protective vegetables) that supports optimal health and immune function which is always our best defense!

The following suggestions from the The National Cancer Institute may reduce HCA and PAH formation while grilling:

  • Avoiding direct exposure of meat to an open flame or a hot metal surface and avoiding prolonged cooking times (especially at high temps) can redue HCA and PHA formation.
  • Continuously turning meat over on a high heat source can substantially reduce HCA formation compared with just leaving the meat on the heat source without flipping it often.
  • Removing charred portions of meat and refraining from using gravy made from meat drippings.

 

Trimming the fat, and using marinades with herbs/spices and an acid component  like vinegar or citrus offers protection also.

Avoid overcooking and processed meats as they already contain cancer causing preservative substances.

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So will I be firing up the grill this Summer?  You betcha!

 

Sincerely in Health,

Cynthia

 

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CSA, Detoxification, Farming, Gardening, Health, Health Food, Holistic, Nutrition, Nutritional Therapy, Organic, Soup, Vegetables, Wellness

Carrot Soup

Healthy vegetarian soup puree

By Cynthia Hill, NTP

“March” into Spring with a quick and easy velvety smooth carrot soup!  Just a handful of fresh ingredients makes this soup the perfect warm up for Spring.  Aside from tasting delicious, carrot soup is packed full of nutrients too.  Carrots are high in vitamin A and a very good source of biotin, vitamin K, fiber, molybdenum, vitamin B6, and vitamin C. Collagen rich chicken stock/bone broth promotes healthy digestion, healthy hair and nail growth, and reduces joint pain and inflammation.  Onions and garlic are  rich in sulphur compounds and flavonoids.  Full fat yogurt provides calcium and good bacteria (probiotics).  Butter of course adds flavor (everything tastes better with butter!) and has a long list of health benefits including promoting  the absorption of minerals, high in vitamin A, E, K, selenium, CLA and antioxidants. And lastly, herbs contain antibacterial/anti-inflammatory/antioxidant properties.

Carrot Soup

Ingredients:

2 lbs. organic carrots, scrubbed and quartered lengthwise

4 cups chicken stock or bone broth (homemade, organic, free range is best)

1 cup finely chopped organic yellow onion

2 small cloves organic garlic

1 cup full fat yogurt (grass-fed or organic is best)

3-4 tbsp. butter (grass-fed or organic is best)

Fresh or dried thyme, dill or parsley

To make:

Salt chicken stock to taste. (a good quality sea salt is best)

Parboil carrots in chicken stock about 12 to 15 minutes until just tender.   Let cool.

While carrots are cooling, sauté the onion and garlic in butter until soft.

Purée  carrots, stock, sautéed onions & garlic and yogurt using a stick blender (or regular blender) until smooth.

Add some fresh thyme, dill or parsley  (or about  1 tsp. dried),  additional salt and pepper to taste.

Heat slowly over low heat until warmed through, or chill and serve cold.

For another pretty presentation, swirl a dollop of sour cream and add a thyme, dill or parsley sprig to individual bowls (optional).

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Recipe adapted from Jennifer Dillman, NTP

 

CSA, Detoxification, Farming, Gardening, Health, Health Food, Holistic, Nutrition, Nutritional Therapy, Organic, Vegetables, Wellness

Get Your Veggies On!

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We all know how good vegetables and fruits are for us.   From anti-aging, disease preventing antioxidants, to vitamins, minerals and fiber, fruits & vegetables are nutritional  powerhouses and the foundation of a healthy diet.  Antidote Wellness Therapies is super excited to be hosting a Summer and Fall CSA with Turtle Creek Gardens.  Turtle Creek Gardens is located just North of Delavan and is USDA/MOSA Certified Organic. Click here to learn more about Turtle Creek Gardens Farm.

Not familiar with a CSA?  CSA stands for Community Supported Agriculture.  A CSA is a great way to purchase local seasonal produce right from the farmer.  Purchasing a CSA allows you to know your farmer and how and where your food is grown, putting your dollars back into the community.

So how does a CSA work?  The farmer offers a certain number of shares to the public.  Shares typically include a box of vegetables but other farm products may be offered as well such as fruits, herbs, eggs, cheese, honey, meats and so on.  Buyers purchase a share or subscription/membership.  In return, the member receives a box of seasonal produce weekly or bi-weekly throughout the growing season delivered to a designated drop off site.

This arrangement is beneficial to both the farmer and the consumer.  The farmer can market during the off-season, receive payment early helping with cash flow, and get an idea on how much and what to plant, and has an opportunity to get to know his/her customers.  The consumer benefits by getting the freshest foods possible direct from the farmer, exposure to new vegetables and ways of cooking them and developing a relationship with the farmer who grows their food.

Turtle Creek Gardens CSA will be delivering right here to Antidote for easy pick up every other Wednesday from 4-6 pm. Wondering what you will receive in your Turtle Creek Gardens CSA box?  View a slide show here.

*The deadline is fast approaching and shares are limited.  Sign up today and enjoy fresh local produce from June to November!  Contact Antidote Wellness Therapies at 262.298.5055 for a sign up form or directly with Turtle Creek Gardens here. (Make a note on the application that Antidote Wellness Therapies is your pick up location).  Please join Antidote as we get our veggies on!

1446167307_d8acf70ad403By Cynthia Hill, Nutritional Therapy Practitioner at Antidote Wellness Therapies